Research Seminar

Seminar Coordinators: Prof. Wenxi JIANG and Prof. Zhenyu GAO

The Lesser Known Convenience Store Know-how

Many shoppers spend more than what they expect when they enter convenience stores. Eat and Travel Weekly invites Prof. Lisa Wan to share the convenience store tactics that span from store sign to product display

Many shoppers spend more than what they expect when they enter convenience stores. Underlying these consumption behaviors is the careful strategic planning by the stores.

In an interview with Eat and Travel Weekly, Prof. Lisa Wan, Director of Center for Hospitality and Real Estate Research and an assistant professor of the School of Hotel and Tourism Management at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) Business School, explained the convenience store tactics that span from store sign to product display.

Store sign gives shoppers the first brand impression, and those with simple and bright colors easily get into the mind. Prof. Wan shared, “In recent years, not only convenience stores but many global brands are simplifying their logos.” Modern aesthetic standards points to simplistic design, which brings convenience to brands in future expansion of their business.

Purchase decisions of shoppers would also be influenced by the display position of products. “The optimal position refers to the product shelves at eye level, and they are usually located on the middle to upper shelves”. Popular snacks and cup noodles that can easily elicit the urge to shop on sight are commonly found at this position; Daily necessities or on sale items are often displayed on the base shelves. Explaining the reason hot items are usually placed on the right, Prof. Wan added, “The majority of us are right-handed, making our consumption modes relatively inclined to the right hand side.

On the other hand, promotion end is seen as the most sought-after and eye-catching position for new products. Some convenience store introduces special product themes such as sakura, direct deliveries from Korea and Japan there. “Shoppers are inclined to seek variety in their purchases. Introducing seasonal items or new products with a theme can make them feel that a wide selection is offered,” said Prof. Wan.

Other tactics of convenience stores include having highly transparent glass walls, displaying related purchases nearby, and inducing impulsive buying near checkout lanes etc.

Please click the image below to read the full feature written in Chinese. 
 

Media: Eat and Travel Weekly飲食男女

Section: Cover story

Date published: 23 March, 2017

Re: Prof. Lisa Wan

Eat and Travel Weekly 23Mar17 Cover Eat and Travel Weekly 23Mar17-02